4 Reasons Why Sleeping On Your Stomach Is Bad for You

With everyone having busy lives and loads of distractions during the day, most people are glad to get any sleep at all. Once their tiresome working day is over, people want only one thing—to get under the sheets and get a good night’s sleep. But what about the position that you’re in while sleeping? Most people don’t think about that once they’re in bed, but you should know that some positions could actually allow you to sleep better at night.

When it comes to sleeping on your stomach, many people are wondering if that position is damaging to their health. The short answer to this question would be: yes, it is. Even though it can help prevent sleep apnea and reduce snoring, this position has a negative impact on your back and neck, which leads to poor sleep and the feeling of discomfort throughout the rest of the day. Plus, it can be uncomfortable for pregnant women to sleep in this position.

Let’s have a look at the three most important reasons why sleeping on your stomach is not good for you:

1. It Places a Strain On Your Spine

As you’ve probably already heard, many people who sleep on their stomach experience some kind of pain—whether it is in their joints, back, or neck. It is sure to affect how much sleep they get during the night. Such pains usually lead to waking up in the middle of the night, directly affecting the amount of sleep that you’ll get, which then leads to a feeling of discomfort during the rest of the day.

According to one, sleeping on your stomach is bad for your back, as it places a certain amount of strain and pressure on your spine. The reason behind this is that the middle part of your body is exactly where most of the weight is, making it difficult to maintain a neutral position of the spine during the night.

This stress on the spine leads to increased stress on the rest of your body structure and, additionally, to pain in all parts of the body, since the spine could be considered as a pipeline for the nerves. It also leads to sensations such as numbness and tingling, which are rather uncomfortable.

2. It Causes the Pain in Your Neck

Just like with the spine, sleeping on your stomach may also cause neck problems. Unless you manage to find a way to breathe through the pillow, you have to turn your head to one side when you’re sleeping on your stomach. This causes your neck to be twisted, putting your spine and head out of alignment, leading to some severe damage. You probably won’t notice this damage after only one night, but the problems will unquestionably become evident over time.

One of the biggest neck problems that you certainly don’t want to experience is the so-called herniated disk. This issue appears when the spinal vertebrae shift enough to cause a rupture of the gelatinous disk inside, causing the gel to leak out and irritate the nerves. This is very painful and requires professional treatment to heal.

3. It’s Really Bad For Moms-To-Be

It gets harder and harder to physically sleep on your stomach in the later pregnancy stages  even if you wanted to (hello, baby bump). After week 16 or so, it might start to feel like you’re laying on a growing watermelon. Plus, the  extra weight around the middle of the body increases the pull on the spine and can lead to acute back pain. And pregnant women don’t need any extra reasons for back pain.

Although it’s not necessarily dangerous for the baby, it can be uncomfortable for you.  suggests that when a pregnant woman is sleeping on her left side, the healthy blood flow will be increased and thus provide the optimum levels of oxygen for both the baby and its mother. If you would like to make it easier for you to stay in this position check our recommended maternity pillow picks

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